Ecmt1020 Assignment Sheet

The Program

The University of Sydney is one of Australia’s most prestigious universities and hosts a student body of 42,300. Modeled after Oxford and Cambridge, Sydney has built upon those traditions to reach its own excellence in scholarship and research.  Today, more than 100 teaching departments are organized into eighteen faculties. The campus boasts beautiful gray stone buildings on grassy courtyards and has its own park and has convenient amenities, including a bank, bookstore, cafe, student bulletin boards, doctor’s office, hairdresser, travel agent, and much more. For a small fee, you can join the Sports Union and gain access to sports ovals, an indoor pool, tennis pavilion, gymnasium, recreation center, and even a ski hut at Thredbo Alpine Village!

The Academics

Sydney is an excellent university with many well regarded programs. Arts and humanities are particularly popular with students.  You are required to take a regular full-time program, usually three or four courses.  Your work is assessed for final letter grades according to regular departmental standards, which include final exams at the end of the semester.

In order to earn credit at UConn for courses completed on this program, individual courses must be approved by a designated UConn course evaluator and assigned a UConn course number. Complete instructions for this process can be found under Academics.

Important!
This list of course equivalents indicates courses that other students have taken in the past. It does not guarantee that they will be available when you participate in the program. If you want to take a course that is not on the list below click on “Academics” to access information on the course accreditation process.General Education course substitution: your school or college will decide if specific study abroad courses can be used to fulfill General Education Requirements. You will need to individually petition your school for the substitution.  For exact information, go to “Academics” and “Gen Ed Substitution”.Note: All study abroad courses have to be assigned a UConn course department number by faculty departmental evaluators before they can be posted and later considered for any minor, major, gen ed, or elective credit.
UConn Dept. and #University Course TitleForeign #Foreign CourseCreditsAccreditation Expiration Date
ANTH 1093Foreign StudyRLST1002The History of God36/30/2016 – needs to be reaccredited
CAMS 1101 or HIST 3993Greek Civilization or Foreign StudyANHS1600Foundations of Ancient Greece36/30/2016 – needs to be reaccredited
ECON 2201Intermediate Microeconomic TheoryECOS2001Intermediate Microeconomics36/30/2021
ECON 2202Intermediate Macroeconomic TheoryECOS2002Intermediate Macroeconomics36/30/2021
ECON 2311Empirical Methods in Economics IECMT1020Introduction to Econometrics36/30/2021
ECON 3493Foreign StudyECON3027Economics of the Family312/31/2021
FNCE 3101Financial ManagementFINC 2011Corporate Finance I312/31/2018
HIST 2206History of ScienceHPSC2100The Birth of Modern Science36/30/2016 – needs to be reaccredited
HIST 3993 or CAMS 1101Foreign Study or Greek CivilizationANHS1600Foundations for Ancient Greece36/30/2016 – needs to be reaccredited
MGMT 1801Contemporary Issues in the World of ManagementWORK 2201Foundations of Management312/31/2018
MKTG 3101Introduction to Marketing ManagementMKTG 1001Marketing Principles36/30/2019
MUSI 1193Foreign StudyMUSC 1507Sounds, Screens and Speakers: Music and Media312/31/2019
NRE 3693Foreign Studies in Natural ResourcesEDUH4052Learning in Outdoor Education312/31/2019
NRE 3693International Studies in Nutritional SciencesEDGU1003Diet and Nutrition for Health and Sport312/31/2021
OPIM 3104Operations ManagementQBUS 2330Operations Management36/30/2019

The Experience

Because of its size, the University of Sydney has numerous housing options for students. ISA students live in residential colleges, university apartments, or in housing with other ISA students. Most of the University of Sydney housing options require a commute to campus.

The “world’s friendliest city” welcomes students with a beautiful harbor location, easy access to beaches, and a vibrant entertainment scene.  Sydney’s collection of distinct neighborhoods offers a huge range of lifestyles and cultures, while an excellent public transportation system ties it all together.

The main University of Sydney campus is located next to the laid-back trendy Glebe neighborhood, home to a cafe culture and a New Age attitude.  The Newtown neighborhood to the southwest caters to students with great, inexpensive restaurants and a rich mix of cultures.  The campus is about thirty minutes from the closest beach.

Click here for information on applying to an ISA program.

Finances

Please note that certain fees associated with this program will appear on your UConn fee bill. These fees are required in addition to the costs billed to you directly by the third party program provider. For exact information on these additional costs, please visit this program’s budget sheet by clicking the link below.

This program charges program fees and not tuition. This affects the types of financial aid that can be applied to defray the cost. Contact the UConn Office of Financial Aid Services for information regarding your individual financial aid package.

You may apply the following types of financial aid to the cost of this program: CT Aid for Public College Students Grant, Federal Title IV Funds including Pell Grant, SEOG, Stafford Loans, Perkins Loans, Parent Loans, and private scholarships.

You may not apply the following types of financial aid to the cost of this program: Federal Work Study, Tuition Remission Grant, University Grant, Tuition Waiver, and academic scholarships (such as Day of Pride, Nutmeg, Presidential, Leadership and Academic Excellence Scholarship).

Budget Sheets:Spring
The Details

  • Location: Sydney, Australia
  • Terms: Academic Year, Fall, Spring
  • Homepage:Click to visit

Dates / Deadlines:

TermYearApp DeadlineDecision DateStart DateEnd Date
Academic Year201803/08/201803/15/2018TBDTBD
Fall201803/08/201803/15/2018TBDTBD
Spring201910/01/201810/08/2018TBDTBD

Fact Sheet:

Class status:2nd Year, 3rd Year, 4th+ YearAcademic area:Engineering, Humanities, Kinesiology, Sciences, Social Sciences, Agriculture, Arts, Business
Language of instruction:EnglishPrior language study required:None
Open to non-UConn students:NoRequired GPA:3

Unit descriptions

Structure of Honours in Arts and Social Sciences

Honours has different codes from junior and senior Arts and Social Sciences undergraduate units of study. Honours students enrol in four shell units, two for each semester of full-time study, which are together worth a total of 48 credit points. For instance, Philosophy Honours Students enrol in PHIL4011 Philosophy Honours A, PHIL4012 Philosophy Honours B, PHIL4013 Philosophy Honours C, and PHIL4014 Philosophy Honours D unit. These shell units do not correspond directly to the Honours seminars or thesis: they are simply the Student Records system's way of registering that you are enrolled in a 48 credit point Honours program. This means that when you choose your Honours seminars, the only people involved are you, the department Honours Coordinator, and the seminar's teacher.

American Studies

AMST1001 Global America


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr. David Smith Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 2x1000wd essays (2x30%), tutorial participation (10%) and 1x1.5 hr exam (30%)

Note: Students intending to do a major in American Studies must complete AMST1001 and either HSTY1023 or HSTY1076

This unit will investigate the global connectedness of the United States and how this relates to the core values and interests that define America. The primary focus will be on the United States in the 21st global century. The pedagogical aim of this unit is to provide students with analytical frames to understand the most important issues in contemporary American literature, culture, politics, society and the economy, and how they are affected by and affect the world outside the US.

AMST2601 American Foundations


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rebecca Sheehan and Dr Michael Thompson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: AMST1001 and (HSTY1076 or HSTY1023) Assessment: 1x1500wd group presentation (30%) and 2x1500wd essays (2x30%) and tutorial participation (10%)

This unit introduces students to the contradictory richness of 'Americanness' from an interdisciplinary standpoint and prepares them for the Major in American Studies. It is divided into different modules, each addressing a core national myth. We will approach each module from a variety of angles: historiographical, literary and visual, opening lines of interrelation between historical and imaginary forms in the construction and ongoing redefinition of the United States.

AMST2801 American Studies Exchange


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Clare Corbould Session: Semester 1,Semester 2

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Students enrolled at Sydney University who wish to take the equivalent of a 6 credit-point senior unit of study in American Studies at an approved overseas university should enrol in this unit. Such students must seek approval for their proposed course of study from the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the American Studies Program.

AMST2802 American Studies Exchange


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

See AMST2801

AMST2803 American Studies Exchange


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

See AMST2801

AMST2804 American Studies Exchange


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

See AMST2801

AMST2805 American Studies Exchange


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

See AMST2801

AMST2806 American Studies Exchange


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

See AMST2801

AMST4011 American Studies Honours A


Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2x2-hr seminars Prerequisites: A credit average or better in 48 senior credit points of American Studies, including AMST2601 Assessment: A thesis of 18,000-20,000 words and 6000-8000 words of written work or its equivalent for each semester.

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

The Honours program in American Studies consists of: 1. A thesis written under the supervision of one member of the academic staff of the American Studies program 2. Two seminars that meet weekly for two hours for one semester, one offered by the American Studies program, one chosen, in consultation with the coordinator of American Studies, from the Honours seminars offered by the departments of English, History and Film Studies. The thesis should be 18,000-20,000 words in length. Each seminar requires 6000-8000 words of work. The thesis is worth 60% of the final Honours seminar and each of the seminars is worth 20%.

AMST4012 American Studies Honours B


Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Please refer to AMST4011 Corequisites: AMST4011

Refer to AMST4011

AMST4013 American Studies Honours C


Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Please refer to AMST4011 Corequisites: AMST4012

Refer to AMST4011

AMST4014 American Studies Honours D


Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Please refer to AMST1001 Corequisites: AMST4013

Refer to AMST4011

Ancient History

ANHS1600 Foundations for Ancient Greece


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alastair Blanshard Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x500wd-equivalent tutorial presentation (5%), participation (15%), 1x1500wd research exercise (40%), 1x2hr exam (40%)

Delphic oracles, epic stories of heroes, graceful temples, tales of lust and tyranny - the Greek world has much to delight and surprise. This unit of study will introduce you to the study of ancient Greek history and culture and provides a springboard for further studies in history, archaeology and literature. It is informed by a cross-disciplinary approach that combines a variety of perspectives to achieve a holistic view of the ancient world.

ANHS1601 Foundations for Ancient Rome


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Eleanor Cowan Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x500wd exercise (10%), participation (15%), 1x1500wd research exercise (35%) and 1x2hr exam (40%)

From Spain to Turkey, from Britain to Africa, ancient Rome has left physical and cultural reminders of its role as ancient superpower. This unit of study will introduce you to the city of Rome itself, its turbulent history, its empire and its vibrant culture. It will provide a springboard for further studies in history, archaeology and literature. It is informed by a cross-disciplinary approach that combines a variety of perspectives to achieve a holistic view of the ancient world.

ANHS1602 Greek and Roman Myth


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Eric Csapo Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: CLCV1001 Assessment: tutorial quizzes (15%), tutorial participation (10%), 1x1500wd written assignment (35%), and 1x2hr exam (40%)

Stories about Greek and Roman gods, heroes, and monsters occupy an important place in Western culture. Greco-Roman mythology is the fount of inspiration for masterpieces of art, music, and literature. This unit examines these enduring ancient narratives, symbols, and mythical ideas in their historical, cultural and religious context. Learn about the manifold meanings of myth, its transformations and transgressions, its uses and abuses from antiquity to the present day.

ANHS1801 Ancient History Exchange


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

ANHS2601 Ancient Imperialism


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alastair Blanshard Session: Semester 1,Summer Early Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of ANHS or HSTY OR 6 junior credit points of ANHS and 6 credit points of HSTY, ARCA, PHIL, GRKA or LATN Prohibitions: ANHS2001 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (45%), 1x2000wd class paper (45%) and tutorial participation (10%)

The ancient Mediterranean witnessed the rise and fall of several great empires. At the heart of each was a city-state. How did single cities come to dominate their neighbours? How were the experiences of each city-state different and why? This unit compares the material factors and the ideology which lay behind the success and failure of Athens, Rome and Sparta. Why did Rome survive for such a long period while the dominance of the Greek city-states was short-lived?

ANHS2605 Ancient Greek Religion


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Julia Kindt Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures and 1x1-hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Ancient History, Classical Studies, Ancient Greek or History OR 6 junior credit points of Ancient History and 6 junior credit points of either Latin, Greek (Ancient), Classical Studies, History, Philosophy, Archaeology (Classical) or Archaeology (Near Eastern) Assessment: 1x2000wd class paper (40%), 1x2hr exam (30%), 1x500wd reading journal (15%) and participation (15%)

This unit explores Greek religion as a defining feature of what it meant to be Greek. We will investigate similarities and differences between religious beliefs and practices throughout the ancient Greek world and trace how religion changed over time. Topics addressed include sacrifice, religious festivals and games, the use (and abuse) of divination, and shared notions of purity and pollution.

ANHS2609 Alexander and the Hellenistic World


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Richard Miles Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lecture/week and 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points of ANHS or HSTY OR 6 credit points of ANHS and 6 credit points of ARCA, GRKA, HSTY, LATN or PHIL Assessment: 1x2hr exam (40%), 1x2500wd essay (50%), tutorial participation (10%)

The legacy of Alexander the Great is often defined as one of military conquest. However it was also an age when scholars revolutionized the way poetry was written, artists found new ways of representing the body in extraordinarily life-like terms and radical new philosophies competed for hearts and minds. From Greece to Afghanistan we will explore a wonderfully diverse and vibrant world that was as much united by culture and learning as it was statecraft and steel.

ANHS2612 Historiography Ancient and Modern


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 junior credit points of Ancient History or History or Asian Studies) or (6 junior credit points of Ancient History or History or Asian Studies and 6 junior credit points of either Classical Studies, Latin, Greek (Ancient), or Archaeology) Prohibitions: ANHS2691, ANHS2692 Assessment: 1x2000wd class paper (40%), 1x2hr exam (30%), 1x500wd reading journal (15%) and participation (15%)

Greco-Roman historiography remains a central object of inquiry for students of the ancient world. This unit examines samples of Greco-Roman historiography in light of their original contexts and of modern approaches. Topics will include: Why did the ancients invent and how did they exploit literary representations of the past? What were their methods and their criteria for ascertaining historical truths? How was history implicated in Greco-Roman literature and in Greco-Roman culture? How can modern historiographical theories illuminate ancient practices?

ANHS2613 Ancient Greece and Rome on Film


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alastair Blanshard Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week and 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Ancient History, Classical Studies, Ancient Greek or History OR 6 junior credit points of Ancient History and 6 junior credit points of either Latin, Greek (Ancient), Classical Studies, History, Philosophy, Archaeology (Classical) or Archaeology (Near Eastern) Assessment: 1x2000wd essay, 1x2hr exam and tutorial participation

This unit examines the relationship between cinematic visions of antiquity and the writing of ancient history. In particular, it aims to look at how different schools, ideas, and methodologies in ancient history are reflected in cinematic production. Topics to be discussed include the role of historical consultants in film production, archaeological remains and the creation of 'the antique', cinema as an alternate site for the production of 'ancient history', and the utility of filmic metaphors for the practice of history.

ANHS2616 Tragedy and Society in Greece and Rome


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Robert Cowan Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lecture/week and 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points of ANHS, GRKA, HSTY or LATN OR 6 credit points of ANHS and 6 credit points of ARCA, ENGL, GRKA, HSTY, LATN or PHIL. Assessment: 1x2hr exam (40%), 1x1500wd essay (30%), tutorial presentation (10%), 1x500wd review of performance (10%), participation (10%)

Oedipus, Agamemnon, Medea - tragedy as a genre and as a worldview was invented in Classical Athens and has dominated Western culture ever since. This unit will explore all aspects of tragedy in Athens and Rome from the poetry of its language to the theatricality of its staging, but with particular emphasis on how it reflected and shaped the societies in which it was performed, and engaged with those societies' central concerns: gender, religion and politics, war, justice and ethnicity.

ANHS2804 Ancient History Exchange


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

ANHS2805 Ancient History Exchange


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

ANHS2806 Ancient History Exchange


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

ANHS2810 Ancient History Exchange


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

ANHS2811 Ancient History Exchange


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

ANHS3601 The Mediterranean World and Civil War


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kathryn Welch Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of ANHS or HSTY OR 6 junior credit points of ANHS and 6 credit points of HSTY, ARCA, PHIL, GRKA or LATN Prohibitions: ANHS3901, ANHS3911 Assessment: 1x2500wd class paper (60%), 1x1hr exam (20%) and 1x1000wd reading log (20%)

Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.

In 88BC, Mithridates of Pontus challenged Rome by organising rebellion in Roman Asia. Simultaneously, Rome itself was beset by the first of three civil wars. A century of chaos across the Mediterranean had begun! We will study the age of Pompeius, Caeser, Cicero, Antonius, Octavian and Cleopatra from east to west in order to see how each side affected the other. The rich evidence allows us to develop a range of skills in and aproaches to historical research and analysis.

ANHS4011 Ancient History Honours A


Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Roche Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: two seminars, each seminar meeting for 2 hours per week for one semester Prerequisites: Credit average in 36 senior credit points of ANHS including ANHS2612 (or equivalent) AND 12 senior credit points (or equivalent) of GRKA or LATN Assessment: a thesis of 18,000-20,000 word and 6,000 words of written work or its equivalent for each seminar

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

The Honours program in Ancient History consists of:
1. a thesis written under the supervision of one or more members of academic staff
2. two seminars that meet weekly for two hours for one semester.
The thesis should be of 18,000-20,000 words in length. Each seminar requires 6,000 words of written work or it equivalent.
The thesis is worth 50% of the final Honours mark and each of the seminars is worth 25%.
The following seminars are on offer in 2013:
Ancient Greek History (Ben Brown)
Roman History (Dr Elly Cowan)
For more information, contact Dr Paul Roche, Honours coordinator.

ANHS4013 Ancient History Honours C


Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Roche Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Refer to ANHS4011 Corequisites: ANHS4012 Assessment: Refer to ANHS4011

Refer to ANHS4011

ANHS4014 Ancient History Honours D


Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Roche Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Refer to ANHS4011 Corequisites: ANHS4013 Assessment: Refer to ANHS4011

Refer to ANHS4011

Anthropology

ANTH1001 Cultural Difference: An Introduction


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Gaynor Macdonald (s1) Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial or equivalent in intensive Summer session Prohibitions: ANTH1003 Assessment: 1x1000wd essay (15%), 1x1500wd essay (30%), 1x2hr exam (40%) and tutorial participation (15%)

Anthropology explores and explains cultural difference while affirming the unity of humankind. It provides accounts of cultural specificity that illuminate the world today. Lectures will address some examples of cultural difference from the present and the past. These examples will introduce modern Anthropology, the method of ethnography, and its related forms of social and cultural analysis.

Textbooks

A Reader will be available at the University Copy Centre

ANTH1002 Anthropology and the Global


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Terry Woronov Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: ANTH1004 Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (45%), 1x2hr exam (45%) and tutorial participation (10%)

Anthropology's long-term ethnographic method, within a specific cultural setting, allows for a particularly intimate understanding of people's experiences of the social worlds they inhabit. This course shows the importance of this experiential intimacy for understanding some of the key issues associated with globalisation: the culturally diverse forms of global capitalism, the transnational communities emanating from global population movements, the transformations of colonial and post-colonial cultures, the rise of global movements and the corresponding transformation of Western nationalism.

Textbooks

A reader will be available at the University Copy Centre

ANTH1801 Social Anthropology Exchange


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

ANTH1802 Social Anthropology Exchange


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

ANTH2601 The Ethnography of Southeast Asia


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Anthropology Assessment: 1x1500wd essay (30%), 1x2500wd essay (45%), 1x350wd seminar presentation (10%), 1x150wd map exercise (5%), tutorial participation (10%)

Southeast Asia is a region of great geographic and cultural diversity, a meeting point for civilizational influences from India and China including the religions of Islam, Buddhism and Hinduism. It is also the laboratory for much anthropological inquiry, attracting the attention of prominent anthropologists and social scientists, like Geertz and Anderson. This unit will examine Southeast Asia in historical and contemporary context, and give grounded ethnographic illustration to such issues as nationalism, cities, migration, political violence, environment and agriculture.

Textbooks

A reader will be available from the University Copy Centre

ANTH2606 Culture and the Unconscious


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jadran Mimica Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Anthropology Assessment: 1x3500wd essay (70%) and 1x2hr exam (30%)

This is a unit on psychoanalytic anthropology. With the focus on the unconscious dimension of human cultural existence the unit critically examines the systematic topical, theoretical, ethnographic and historical aspects of this unique field of anthropological inquiry. All psychoanalytic conceptual frameworks are elucidated and assessed through ethno-psychoanalytic work done in different cultural life-worlds. Firmly grounded in detailed ethnographic evidence the unit provides a comprehensive phenomenological-existential validation of the discipline and its contribution to both anthropology and psychoanalysis.

Textbooks

A reader will be available at the University Copy Centre

ANTH2623 Gender: Anthropological Studies


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Summer Late Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week or equivalent in intensive Summer session Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points from Anthropology Prohibitions: ANTH2020, ANTH2023 Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (55%), 1x1500wd essay (35%) and 1x500wd tutorial paper and presentation (10%)

This unit explores the social and cultural dimensions of gender and sexuality in non-western societies. The main focus is the body in two interrelated senses. Firstly, how the body is culturally constructed by giving aspects of gender and sexuality meanings that do not simply reflect biology. Secondly, how bodies are socially constructed, for example through ritual. The relations of the dimensions of the body to the articulation of power and social change are also considered.

Textbooks

A reader will be available at the University Copy Centre

ANTH2625 Culture and Development


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Robbie Peters Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Anthropology Assessment: 1x1500wd essay (30%), 1x2500wd essay (45%), 1x500wd tutorial presentation (15%) tutorial participation (10%)

The 1949 speech by US president, Harry Truman, declared his country's commitment to the 'development' of the Third World, and began what many consider to be development as an institutional approach to non-Western societies. Anthropology, well established in its study of non-Western societies, was able to offer a rich ethnographic insight into the developing world. Combining ethnographic detail with social science concepts, this unit covers topics such as food crisis, land, environment, cities, fair trade, migration, nation-state, NGOs, poverty and informal economy.

ANTH2627 Medical Anthropology


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Anthropology Prohibitions: ANTH2027 Assessment: 1x1000wd essay (30%), 1x3000wd take-home exercise (60%) and tutorial participation (10%)

Medical anthropology is a comparative and ethnographic response to the global influence of biomedicine within diverse cultural worlds. This unit will examine major theoretical approaches, their respective critiques, and the methods that underpin them. Concepts such as 'health/illness', 'disease', 'well-being', 'life-death', and 'body/mind' will be located in a variety of cultural contexts and their implications for different approaches to diagnosis and treatment considered. The unit will include culturally located case studies of major contemporary health concerns such as AIDS.

Textbooks

readings will be available at the University Copy Centre

ANTH2629 Race and Ethnic Relations


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Luis Fernando Angosto Ferrandez Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Anthropology Prohibitions: ANTH2117 Assessment: 1x1000wd essay (15%), 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (35%) and participation (10%)

A comparative study of race and ethnic group relations. The unit will consider the history of ideas of 'race' and practices of racialising and their relationship to ethnicity. It will draw on studies from various areas including North America, the Caribbean, Japan and Australia.

Textbooks

reading lists will be available at the beginning of lectures

ANTH2630 Indigenous Australians and Modernity


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Gaynor Macdonald Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Anthropology Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (35%), 2x250wd assignments (20%), 1x2hr exam (35%) and tutorial participation (10%)

Australian Aboriginal peoples have always engaged with the 'modern world' but Enlightenment ideas established a colonial context juxtaposing modernity with tradition. Indigenous difference was locked into past-oriented, static and small scale traditions. The unit examines some key concepts of modernity, including progress, civility, change, tradition - and modernity itself - so as to shed light on Australian Indigenous people's experiences, past and present, as colonial subjects. The unit will explore Aboriginal engagement with, for instance, work, vehicles, the law, and the arts (painting, music etc) as practices through which Aboriginal people have sought 'alternative modernities'.

Textbooks

A reader will be available at the University Copy Centre

ANTH2631 Being There: Method in Anthropology


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Linda Connor Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Anthropology plus 12 Senior credit points from Anthropology Assessment: 1x1500wd essay (30%), 1x3000wd fieldwork-based project (60%), and tutorial participation (10%)

Anthropology's distinctive method, termed ethnography, is grounded in long term participation in the cultural contexts that anthropologists describe and analyse. This unit explores the disciplined but open nature of anthropological research and the radically contextual modes of interpretation that are embedded in the lives of its subjects. Issues include: the history of the method; the diverse situations in which anthropologists practice; the way that fieldwork experience shapes the method. Students will devise and report on their own project.

Textbooks

A reader will be available at the University Copy Centre

ANTH2654 Forms of Families


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ryan Schram Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Anthropology Assessment: 1x100wd terminology quiz (10%), 1x400wd discussion questions (10%), 1x1500wd critical essay (30%), 1x2500wd comparative essay (40%) and tutorial participation (10%)

Where does nature stop and culture begin? This is why anthropologists study kinship. In this unit we will survey the development of this field from its origins to its contemporary form as a critical investigation of how culture shapes the way we think about personhood, relationships, sex, gender and the body. We will compare various types of kinship systems and discuss controversies over kinship - same-sex marriage, single-parent households, cloning, in-vitro fertilization, and alternative forms of family - from a cross-cultural perspective.

ANTH2655 The Social Production of Space


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Yasmine Musharbash Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Anthropology. Prohibitions: ANTH3911 Assessment: 1x3000wd essay (50%), 1x1.5hr exam (35%) and tutorial presentation/participation (15%)

Space/place appears in anthropology as both a product of historically specific social practice and as an irreducible dimension of any social formation. This theoretical tension will be explored through examination of such themes as: the contradiction between the global as abstract space and the local as qualitatively distinct place; struggles over the definition and control of space; space/time as an aspect of any world; centre/periphery and inside/outside as pervasive tropes of social analysis.

Textbooks

reading lists will be available at the beginning of lectures

ANTH2666 History of Anthropological Thought


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jadran Mimica Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Anthropology Prohibitions: ANTH2501 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (35%) and 1x2500wd essay (65%)

This unit surveys the key thinkers, theories and ethnographic researches that have shaped the historical development of anthropological thought. The central focus is on the interrelationships and differences between the Continental, British and American thinkers and lineages set against the backdrop of general ideas that defined the Western world-views of the last two centuries. This historical trajectory is systematically referred to its much longer tradition of critical thought and coordinated with the topics and debates in contemporary anthropological discourses.

Textbooks

A reader available from the University Copy Centre

ANTH2667 The Anthropology of Religion


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ryan Schram Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Anthropology Assessment: 10x100wd reflections (15%), 1x1500wd essay (30%), 1x2000wd research essay (45%), tutorial participation (10%).

This Unit will examine various ways anthropologists have theorised religious belief and practice, and we will challenge these ideas by looking at the vast diversity of religious forms. Starting with the major theories of Durkheim, Weber and others, the Unit will focus on what anthropologists have identified as the key elements of religious forms cross-culturally. It will also look at debates around these ideas. Special emphasis will be put on the continuing salience of religious ideas and identities in modernity.

ANTH2804 Social Anthropology Exchange


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

ANTH2805 Social Anthropology Exchange


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

ANTH2806 Social Anthropology Exchange


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

ANTH2810 Social Anthropology Exchange


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

ANTH2811 Social Anthropology Exchange


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

ANTH3601 Contemporary Theory and Anthropology


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jadran Mimica Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 senior credit points from Anthropology at credit level or above Prohibitions: ANTH3921, ANTH3922 Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (40%) and 1x3500wd essay (60%)

This honours preparation unit will assist students to define their objectives in anthropology and anticipate their honours year through: 1) exploring key concepts of anthropological analysis and critique, 2) increasing their knowledge of the ethnographic method and its contemporary challenges, 3) developing library research skills and experience in formulating a research project.

Textbooks

A reader will be available at the University Copy Centre

ANTH3602 Reading Ethnography


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Linda Connor Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 senior credit points from Anthropology at credit level or above Prohibitions: ANTH3611, ANTH3612, ANTH3613, ANTH3614 Assessment: 2x3000wd essays (2x50%)

Note: this unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program

Ethnography is grounded on the 'participant observation' of social practice and the interpretation of values and experience in particular social contexts. It makes the strange familiar, and the familiar strange. This unit will focus on the relationship between research methods and design and the development of regionally and thematically specific debates in anthropology.

ANTH4011 Social Anthropology Honours A


Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Neil Maclean Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2x2hr seminars/week in Semester 1 Prerequisites: 48 senior credit points in Anthropology with at least a credit average grade. Units must include ANTH3601 and ANTH3602. Requirements for the Pass degree must be completed before entry to level 4000 honours units of study. Corequisites: ANTH4012, ANTH4013, ANTH4014 Assessment: A thesis of 18000-20000 words and 6000 words of written work or its equivalent for each seminar

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

The Honours program in Anthropology consists of:
1. a thesis written under the supervision of one member of academic staff;
2. two seminars that meet weekly for 2-3 hrs each in Semester 1.
The thesis should be of 18000-20000wds in length. Each seminar requires 6000wds of written work, or its equivalent.
The thesis is worth 60% of the final Honours mark and each of the seminars is worth 20%.
The department will offer the following two Honours seminars in 2013:
Anthropology of the Nation-State;
Nature and Culture.
For more information, contact the Honours Coordinator.

ANTH4012 Social Anthropology Honours B


Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ryan Schram Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ANTH4011

refer to ANTH4011

ANTH4013 Social Anthropology Honours C


Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ANTH4012

refer to ANTH4011

ANTH4014 Social Anthropology Honours D


Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ANTH4013

refer to ANTH4011

Arabic Language and Literature

ARBC1611 Arabic Introductory 1B


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ali Aldahesh Session: Semester 1 Classes: 4x1-hr seminars/week Prohibitions: ARBC1311, ARBC1312, ARBC1101, ARBC1102 Assessment: 1x2.5hr exam (equivalent to 2000wds) (50%), written and oral exercises (equivalent to 800wds) (20%), 1x1000wd mid-semester exam (25%), class participation (5%)

This unit aims to teach Arabic as a living language. It is meant for students with no previous learning experience of the language. The unit is designed to introduce and build up basic language skills: listening and speaking, reading and writing, using modern standard and educated every-day Arabic. Students will learn basic vocabulary, language structures, morphology and syntax of Arabic in context, through lively dialogues, realistic conversational situations, story lines, exercises and drills, rather than formal grammar. On completion of this unit, students progress to ARBC1612 in second semester.

Textbooks

Nijmeh Hajjar, Living Arabic in Context: An Introductory Course, Beirut, 2005

ARBC1612 Arabic Introductory 2B


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ali Aldahesh Session: Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: ARBC1101 or ARBC1611 Prohibitions: ARBC1311, ARBC1312, ARBC1102 Assessment: 1x2.5hr exam (equivalent to 2000wds) (50%), written and oral exercises (equivalent to 800wds) (20%), 1x2.5hr mid-semester exam (25%) and class participation (5%)

This unit aims to strengthen students' listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in living Arabic. Emphasis will be on building up communicative ability as well as extending the vocabulary and language structures through realistic dialogues and story lines in modern standard and educated every-day Arabic. Morphology and syntax of Arabic are gradually introduced in context through a structured method of progression, using realistic patterns, exercises and drills, rather than formal grammar. On completion of this unit, students progress to ARBC2613.

Textbooks

Nijmeh Hajjar, Living Arabic in Context: Arabic for Beginners, Stage 2, Sydney, 2004. (Consult the department for textbook and audio CDs)

ARBC2613 Arabic Language and Literature 3B


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1 Classes: 4x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: ARBC1102 or ARBC1612 Prohibitions: ARBC1311, ARBC1312, ARBC2633, ARBC2634, ARBC2103 Assessment: 1x2.5hr exam (equivalent to 2000wds) (50%), written and oral exercises (equivalent to 800wds) (20%), 1x2.5hr mid-semester exam (25%), class participation (5%)

This unit aims to extend students' language skills in Arabic and enable them to appreciate Arabic literary texts. Students will be able to build up their communicative ability and extend their knowledge of modern Arabic vocabulary and structures, through realistic dialogues and class activity, including role-playing. They will be introduced to modern Arabic literature through reading and discussing selected texts by prominent authors, in their societal context. On completion of this unit, students progress to ARBC2614.

Textbooks

Language material and a selection of literary texts will be available (consult the department)

ARBC2614 Arabic Language and Literature 4B


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ali Aldahesh Session: Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: ARBC2103 or ARBC2613 Prohibitions: ARBC2104, ARBC1311, ARBC1312, ARBC2313, ARBC2314, ARBC2633, ARBC2634, ARBC3635, ARBC3636, ARBC3637, ARBC3638 Assessment: 1x2.5hr exam (equivalent to 2000wds) (50%), written and oral exercises (equivalent to 800wds) (20%), 1x2.5hr mid semester exam (25%), class participation (5%)

This unit aims at further strengthening students' communicative skills in Arabic, both aural/oral and written, as well as building up their ability to read, appreciate and discuss samples of Arabic literature by prominent authors in their societal context. Students will be able to extend their knowledge of Arabic vocabulary and structures through realistic dialogues, role-playing and the use of a range of recorded material in Arabic. On completion of this unit, students progress to ARBC3615.

Textbooks

Language material and a selection of literary texts will be available (consult the department)

ARBC2633 Arabic Advanced Language & Literature 3A


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HSC Arabic Extension or Arabic Continuers or 70% or above in Arabic Beginners (subject to placement test) Prohibitions: ARBC1311 Assessment: 1x2.5hr exam (equivalent to 2000wds) (50%), written and oral exercises (equivalent to 800wds) (20%), 1x2.5hr mid-semester exam (25%), class participation (5%)

This unit aims to strengthen practical language skills, including writing and translation, to enrich the students' understanding of Arabic literature and culture, develop their analytical and critical skills through reading of a variety of Arabic texts by writers from different Arab countries, focusing on themes of modernity and identity as reflected in modern Arabic essays on political, social and cultural issues and in contemporary Arabic literature in general.

Textbooks

A dossier of texts will be provided

ARBC2634 Arabic Advanced Language & Literature 4A


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: ARBC1311 or ARBC2633 Prohibitions: ARBC1312, ARBC1101, ARBC1102, ARBC1611, ARBC1612 Assessment: 1x2.5hr exam (equivalent to 2000wds) (50%), written and oral exercises (equivalent to 800wds) (20%), 1x2.5hr mid-semester exam (25%), class participation (5%)

This unit aims to strengthen practical language skills in Arabic, building on the approach followed in semester 1, including writing and translation skills to enrich students' understanding of Arabic literature and culture, and to develop their analytical and critical skills through reading of modern Arabic writers from various Arab countries.

Textbooks

A dossier of texts will be provided

ARBC2811 Arabic Exchange


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

ARBC2812 Arabic Exchange


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

ARBC2813 Arabic Exchange


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

ARBC2814 Arabic Exchange


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

ARBC3615 Arabic Language and Literature 5B


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1 Classes: 4x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: ARBC2104 or ARBC2614 Prohibitions: ARBC2105, ARBC1311, ARBC1312, ARBC2313, ARBC2314, ARBC2315, ARBC2316, ARBC2633, ARBC2634, ARBC3635, ARBC3636, ARBC3637, ARBC3638 Assessment: 1x2.5hr exam (equivalent to 2500wds) (50%), written and oral exercises (equivalent to 800wds) (20%), 1x2.5hr mid-semester exam (25%), class participation (5%)

This unit aims to consolidate students' communicative skills, using realistic dialogues in modern standard and educated every-day Arabic, and samples of the Arabic press and electronic media. It equally aims to extend students' knowledge and appreciation of Arabic literature and culture through reading and discussion of representative texts by major Arabic authors in their societal context, with examples from different genres. On completion of this unit, students progress to ARBC3616.

Textbooks

Language material and a selection of literary texts will be available (consult the department)

ARBC3616 Arabic Language and Literature 6B


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ali Aldahesh Session: Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: ARBC2105 or ARBC3615 Prohibitions: ARBC2106, ARBC1311, ARBC1312, ARBC2313, ARBC2314, ARBC2315, ARBC2316, ARBC2633, ARBC2634, ARBC3635, ARBC3636, ARBC3637, ARBC3638 Assessment: 1x2.5hr exam (equivalent to 2500wds) (50%), written and oral exercises (equivalent to 800wds) (20%), 1x2.5hr mid-semester exam (25%), class participation (5%)

This unit aims to consolidate students' competence in Arabic through dialogues in modern standard and educated every-day Arabic, reading and listening to material from the contemporary Arabic media, as well as writing and translation tasks relevant to real life situations. This unit equally aims to extend students' knowledge and appreciation of Arabic literature and culture through reading and discussion of further representative texts by major Arabic authors in their societal context, with examples from different genres.

Textbooks

Language material and a selection of literary texts will be available (consult the department)

ARBC3635 Arabic Advanced Translation & Writing 5A


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: ARBC1312 or ARBC2633 Prohibitions: ARBC2313, ARBC1101, ARBC1102, ARBC1611, ARBC1612 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (equivalent to 2000wds) (50%), written and oral exercises (equivalent to 800wds) (20%), 1x2.5hr mid-semester exam (25%), class participation (5%)

This unit aims to develop written fluency in Arabic and English through translation methodology and skills. The unit is designed to further develop students' advanced writing, reading and interpreting skills. Practical tasks will include translation from Arabic into English and vice versa, using a wide range of texts, including creative literature, the press, business and diplomatic correspondence and basic scientific, technical and literary documents.

Textbooks

Consult the department

ARBC3636 Arabic Advanced for Media Studies 6A


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: ARBC1312 or ARBC2633 Prohibitions: ARBC1101, ARBC1102, ARBC1611, ARBC1612, ARBC2314 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (equivalent to 2000wds) (50%), written and oral exercises (equivalent to 800wds) (20%), 1x2.5hr mid-semester exam (25%), class participation (5%)

This unit aims to strengthen advanced practical language skills in Arabic, including writing and communication, with focus on living Arabic for media studies to enrich students' understanding of Arabic media and culture and to develop their practical and critical skills through dealing with a range of material related to the Arabic media, both written and electronic.

Textbooks

Consult the department

ARBC3637 Arabic Advanced Translation & Writing 7A


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: ARBC1312 or ARBC2633 Prohibitions: ARBC2315, ARBC1101, ARBC1102, ARBC1611, ARBC1612 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (equivalent to 2000wds) (50%), written and oral exercises (equivalent to 800wds) (20%), 1x2.5hr mid-semester exam (25%), class participation (5%)

This unit aims to further develop written fluency in Arabic and English through translation methodology and skills. The unit is designed to further strengthen students' advanced writing, reading, translation and interpreting ability. Practical tasks will include translation from Arabic into English and vice versa, using realistic contexts and a wide range of texts, including creative literature, the press, business and diplomatic correspondence and basic scientific, technical and literary documents.

Textbooks

Consult the department

ARBC3638 Arabic Advanced for Media Studies 8A


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: ARBC1312 or ARBC2633 Prohibitions: ARBC2316, ARBC1101, ARBC1102, ARBC1611, ARBC1612 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (equivalent to 2000wds) (50%), written and oral exercises (equivalent to 800wds) (20%), 1x2.5hr mid-semester exam (25%), class participation (5%)

This unit aims to strengthen advanced practical language skills in Arabic, including writing, translation and communication, with focus on living Arabic for media studies to enrich students' understanding of Arabic media and culture and to develop their practical and critical skills through dealing with a range of material related to the Arabic media, both written and electronic.

Textbooks

Consult the department

ARIS4011 Arabic and Islamic Studies Honours A


Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Two seminars, each seminar meets weekly for 2 hours for one semester Prerequisites: Credit average in 48 senior credit points of Arabic and Islamic Studies, including completion of the major and the special entry unit, ARIS3680 Approaches to Arabic and Islamic Studies. Assessment: A thesis of 18000-20000 words and 2500 words of written work or its equivalent for each seminar.

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

The Honours program in Arabic and Islamic Studies consists of:
1.a thesis written under the supervision of one or more members of academic staff
2. two seminars that meet for two hours a week for one semester.
The thesis should be of 18000-20000 words in length. Each seminar requires 2500 words of written work or its equivalent.
The thesis is worth 50% of the final Honours mark and each of the seminars is worth 25%.
The following seminars are on offer in 2013:
Methodology of Research in Arabic and Islamic Studies (Dr Nijmeh Hajjar)
Practical Advanced Language for Research Purposes (Dr Nijmeh Hajjar)
For more information contact, Dr Nijmeh Hajjar, Honours coordinator.

ARIS4012 Arabic and Islamic Studies Honours B


Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ARIS4011

Refer to ARIS4011

ARIS4013 Arabic and Islamic Studies Honours C


Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ARIS4012

Refer to ARIS4011

ARIS4014 Arabic and Islamic Studies Honours D


Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ARIS4013

Refer to ARIS4011

Arab World, Islam and The Middle East

ARIS1671 Arabs, Islam & Middle East: Introduction


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lucia Sorbera Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x class presentation (20%), 1x2hr final exam (40%)

This unit provides an introduction to the study of the Arab world, Islam and the Middle East. It focuses on Arab and Islamic society and culture in the Middle East. Main themes include: Geographical setting and historical orientations; environment and society, the Arabs and the world of late antiquity; the importance of Arab trade and seafaring; the rise of Islam: the Prophet Muhammad and the Qur'an, Pillars of Islam and Community, the early Arab Islamic Caliphate; religion and politics in the Islamic tradition, Islamic law and society, women and gender issues in Islam, aspects of Middle Eastern socio-economic and cultural life in the age of the Caliphate as a background to the early modern Middle East up to Ottoman times. On completion of this unit, students proceed to ARIS1672 in Semester 2.

Textbooks

Course readings and bibliography will be available

ARIS1672 Arab-Islamic Civilisation: Introduction


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lucia Sorbera Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ARIS1001 or ARIS1671 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1xclass presentation (20%), 1x2hr final exam (40%)

This unit focuses on Arab and Islamic Learning, Spirituality and Art. Themes include: The scope of classical Arabic learning: Qur'anic studies and Prophetic traditions, the Hellenistic legacy in Arabic learning, Islamic philosophy and sciences, geographical writings and historiography, issues in Islamic theology, role of scholars, the concept of knowledge; contribution of Arabic-speaking Christian scholars to classical Arab intellectual life; Islamic asceticism, mysticism and the Sufi orders; Arab and Islamic aesthetics: religious and secular art, architectural design and decoration, the role of calligraphy, geometry and arabesque.

Textbooks

Course readings and bibliography will be available

ARIS2673 Islam and Muslims in World History


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lucia Sorbera Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ARIS1001 or ARIS1671 Prohibitions: ARIS2003 Assessment: 1x2250wd essay (40%), 1x2250wd take-home exercise (40%), class presentation (20%)

Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.

This unit of study focuses on the role of Islam in world history through the discussion of issues of intercultural relations and acculturation. It highlights Islam's place in the Mediterranean world; connections with Eastern Christianity, including Byzantium; the Islamic-European encounter in Spain and Sicily and the Crusades from an Arab perspective. The unit deals with the significance of acculturation and adaptation of Islamic traditions in different parts of Africa and Asia and the role of urbanisation and trade in Islamic history.

Textbooks

Course readings, bibliography and brief notes will be available

ARIS2674 Islam and Politics: Modernity Challenges


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lucia Sorbera Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ARIS1001 or ARIS1671 Prohibitions: ARIS2004 Assessment: 1x2250wd essay (40%), 1x2250wd take-home exercise (40%), class presentation (20%)

Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.

This unit focuses on Islam as a political and cultural force in the modern world, particularly in the Middle East, North Africa and Asia. Issues include: Islamic political thought; the Sunna-Shi'a divergence and the significance of Shi'a Islam; Islamic traditionalism; reform; radicalism; Jihad and 'fundamentalism'; Islamic political movements in Arab countries; Turkey, Iran and Asia; Islam and legitimacy of political regimes; Muslim minorities in the world; current debates on the 'Islamic threat'; 'terrorism'; 'clash of civilisations' and Islamic-Western mutual perceptions.

Textbooks

Course readings, bibliography and brief notes will be available

ARIS2675 Gendering History in the Arab World


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lucia Sorbera Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at Junior level in at least one of the following: Arabic and Islamic Studies, European Studies, European, Middle Eastern or Classical Languages or Studies, English, Government, History, Political Economy, Sociology, Media and Communication, Gender and Cultural Studies. Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (50%), 1x500wd mid semester test (20%), 1x1000wd research project plan (10%), 1x500wd tutorial presentation (20%)

This unit situates contemporary debates about gender in the context of the history of the Middle East and North Africa. The unit focuses on a selection of literary and audiovisual productions from Egypt, Iraq, Palestine, Lebanon and the Maghreb countries. Representations of masculinity (and male and female homosexuality) will form an integral part of the analysis. The interactions of gender, culture and history are analysed through feminist, literary, cultural and historiographical criticism.

ARIS2801 Arab World Islam & Middle East Exchange


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

ARIS2802 Arab World Islam & Middle East Exchange


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

ARIS2803 Arab World Islam & Middle East Exchange


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

ARIS2804 Arab World Islam & Middle East Exchange


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

ARIS2805 Arab World Islam & Middle East Exchange


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

ARIS2806 Arab World Islam & Middle East Exchange


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

ARIS3680 Approaches to Arabic and Islamic Studies


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nijmeh Hajjar Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: Credit in ARIS2673 or ARIS3675 or ARIS2003 or ARIS2005, and credit in ARBC2613 or ARBC3635 or ARBC2103 or ARBC2313 Assessment: 1x3000wd essay in English (40%), 1x500wd summary in Arabic or an additional 1000wd assignment in English (20%), 2x1000wd oral presentations in either Arabic or English (40%)

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