Cover Letter Ps Examples Of Adverbs

One of the distinctions of effective writers is their facility with active verbs. Active verbs carry analytical meaning with efficiency, and when selectively applied to a student’s accomplishments, simplify the goal of categorizing and interpreting the kinds of merits that a student has accrued. They can also help present a student as positive and energetic, admired and respected, mature and serious. In these excerpts from sample letters in Chapter 5, note how the active verbs are used creatively and repeatedly to uplift the student:

Although Janet struggled to see her own potential earlier in her college career, encouragement from her advisor as well as her labmates, coupled with her own growing desire to succeed, transformed this once tentative student into an important contributor to the lab.

Mr. Lerner challenged his class to find multiple ways to make a bulb light using only one battery, one bulb, and one wire.

She developed a solution, built the necessary coalition, developed creative compromises, and worked through to the proposal’s enactment.

For a partial list of some of the active verbs most commonly and effectively used in recommendation letters, consult the list below.

Active Verbs that Establish Potential, Define Character, and Underscore Accomplishment

Accepted
Achieved
Adapted
Adjusted
Administered
Advised
Allocated
Analyzed
Appraised
Approved
Arranged
Assembled
Assessed
Assigned
Assisted
Balanced
Budgeted
Built
Calculated
Catalogued
Checked
Clarified
Classified
Collected
Communicated
Compared
Compiled
Composed
Computed
Conceived
Conducted
Confronted
Constructed
Consulted
Contracted
Controlled
Converted
Conveyed
Coordinated
Correlated
Counseled
Created
Critiqued
Defined
Delegated
Demonstrated
Denounced
Designed
Detailed
Determined
Developed
Devised
Diagnosed
Directed
Discovered
Displayed
Dissected
Distributed
Drafted
Earned
Edited
Effected
Empowered
Encouraged
Enforced
Engineered
Enlarged
Enlightened
Enlisted
Established
Estimated
Evaluated
Examined
Executed
Expanded
Experienced
Experimented
Explained
Facilitated
Formed
Formulated
Founded
Generated
Governed
Grouped
Guided
Handled
Headed
Helped
Honored
Implemented
Improved
Improvised
Increased
Indexed
Informed
Initiated
Innovated
Inspected
Inspired
Installed
Integrated
Interviewed
Investigated
Jointed
Judged
Juried
Justified
Kept
Keynoted
Lectured
Led
Linked
Maintained
Managed
Mapped
Measured
Mediated
Modeled
Moderated
Monitored
Motivated
Navigated
Negotiated
Nominated
Normalized
Noted
Observed
Operated
Ordered
Organized
Originated
Overcame
Participated
Performed
Persuaded
Pioneered
Planned
Positioned
Predicted
Prepared
Presented
Presided
Prioritized
Produced
Programmed
Promoted
Protected
Provided
Qualified
Quantified
Queried
Questioned
Quizzed
Recognized
Recommended
Reconciled
Recorded
Recruited
Reinvented
Reorganized
Reported
Researched
Retrieved
Reviewed
Revised
Scheduled
Screened
Served
Shaped
Simplified
Solved
Sorted
Sparked
Strategized
Strengthened
Supervised
Systematized
Tabulated
Tended
Timed
Trained
Transcribed
Transformed
Translated
Underscored
Undertook
Unified
Utilized
Validated
Valued
Verified
Volunteered
Witnessed
Wrote

 

Importance of Buzz Words for Your Resume’

Comprehensive list of resume buzzwords to use, and how to use them.

This is one of two articles dealing with buzz words. You may want to also read, Buzz Words on a Resume: Why They’re Important

Apparently we are all still searching for the magic buzzwords to use on our résumés, thus today’s blog post is all about the magic buzz words most people are using, buzz words not to use, and why the choice of buzzwords is so critical.

Notice that I said “buzz words” or “buzzwords” 4 times in one sentence?  While I typically wouldn’t write with such redundancy, it seems that search engines like us to break a basic rule of writing — thus, I do so.  And, I’ve allowed for the both spellings: buzz words, or buzzwords, both of which are correct.  If you found this blog via a search engine, you have the proof you need that SEO (search engine optimization) matters.  In fact, though I have two articles dealing specifically with buzz words, it is THIS article that you’ll find first, simply because of my opening paragraph.

Which leads to our first point:

In many instances, computers search your résumé.  It’s known as “ATS” and you can learn more, here.  Résumés need to be loaded with the right buzz words.

I’ve written about the specifics of ATS, and won’t repeat it now.  But if you’re not familiar with how computers read your résumé, I suggest that you might also want to read an earlier article on the topic.

GRAMMAR SCHOOL LESSON

Remember back in grammar school when you first learned about nouns, adjectives, verbs, and adverbs?  Here is a reminder: Nouns, we learned, are used to describe a “person, place, or thing.”  Adjectives describe a noun.  Verbs are “action words.”  Adverbs describe verbs.

The nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs you use in your résumé make up those all- important buzz words that are intended to describe your skill set and achievements, and capture the attention of a computer or human.

NOUNS — Person, Place, Thing

Here is a list of common nouns found in a résumé.  Notice that many of them will differ, depending on your industry:

Common Resume Buzz Words – Nouns

ADJECTIVES — descriptive words that tell us more about the noun

It is the adjectives that “fluff up” a résumé.  Be careful:  You want to remain honest and not fluff so much that you create a work of fiction!

Resume’ Buzz Words – Adjectives

As I said, use adjectives carefully, honestly, and sparingly. If your résumé is overly peppered with these descriptive buzz words, you lose credibility.  If you are not genuinely “meticulous,” for example, choose another word.

VERBS — the ‘action’ words

An action word is one that does something.  For example, sang is the verb in “The girl sang.”  It tells what the noun (the girl) did or is doing.In my opinion, the verbs in a résumé are the most important descriptors.

It is the use of the verb that hopefully provides an accurate description of your achievements.  More than anything, employers are looking for your achievements.  They want to know what you have done, what actions you have taken.  That falls squarely into the world of verbs.

What follows is an exhaustive list of these important verbs, words considered by many as “résumé buzz words.”  Notice that nearly every word has the “ed” suffix.  I’ve listed the verb in its proper tense for use in most résumés:

Verbs — Resume Buzz Words (A-O)

ADVERBS: The verb, described:

Like adjectives, use adverbs sparingly.  Be honest, accurate, and selective.  I personally have only two adverbs in my résumé.  Here is a list of the most frequently used adverbs:

Adverbs — Resume Buzz Words

COMBINING BUZZ WORDS ON YOUR RESUME

Which words you choose and how you combine those words is uniquely up to you. And if I’ve not yet gotten it through to you, let me repeat: Be honest.  Don’t over fluff your stuff!

Let’s first combine a few adjectives and nouns:

  • experienced executive
  • skillful litigator
  • proficient orator
  • successful author
  • proven leader
  • talented negotiator
  • effective communicator
  • detailed researcher

Now, let’s combine a few verbs and adverbs:

  • succinctly demonstrated
  • quickly revealed
  • creatively reconfigured
  • dramatically improved
  • significantly increased
  • reliably calculated
  • progressively strengthened

WORDS NOT TO USE IN YOUR RESUME:

Google reports that many of you search for the phrase, “Buzz words not to use on resume’.”  In my opinion, the use of “buzz words” applies only to words that we should use, not words that are best left in a bar or in a piece of fiction writing.

In general, it is how a word is used that matters most, as opposed to a succinct list of words not to use.  For example, while there is nothing wrong with any of the following words, per se, the way they are used could be problematic:

experience, environment, team, leadership, professional, proven

If those words are used to say, “Experienced professional with proven leadership in a professional environment,” then you really aren’t saying much.  Instead, provide a concrete example:

Provided 10+ years successful team leadership with 20 subordinates, a zero attrition rate, and 80% customer satisfaction at a Fortune 100 company.

Yet you still seek a concrete list of words you should not use.  I know… I know.  So here is the best I can do for you:

A résumé is about accomplishments, not duties.  Thus, only use the following when you don’t yet have work achievements (as in the case of students who are just starting out in their careers):

  • responsibilities included
  • duties included
  • responsible for

Here are a few more no-no’s:

  • use of first person – “I” — as in, “I was the employee of the month.”
  • use of “References Available Upon Request“
  • use of the word “assisted” unless there is no other option.  Focus on your achievement(s) as they relate to your assistance to someone else, and specify it on your résumé.
  • use of the word “seasoned“, as in “seasoned professional.”  This ages you.  Use “experienced” instead.
  • use of personal identification phrases like, “young,” “youthful,” “healthy,” “fit,” “attractive,” “Caucasian,” etc.
  • use of any word that is not accurate and honest

IMPORTANT CONSIDERATIONS

Aside from my over-stating the issue of integrity, the following are important considerations when choosing the best buzz words to use in your résumé:

Don’t use a complex word when something simple will do.  Example: If you “directed” a project, say so.  Don’t say “orchestrated the management of…” or something too fancy.

Use common headings:

“Professional Experience” instead of “Employment Affiliations”; “Achievements” instead of “Notable Accomplishments”

Write in third-person, not first, using phrases, not full sentences:  “Founded successful program for disadvantaged youth,” rather than “I am the founder of a program for disadvantaged youth that was highly successful.”

DO use the buzz words you find in the job description.

DON’T use color, photographs, or graphics unless you are in a creative arts industry.

DO balance the white space in your document, and use 12pt font if possible.  (I use an 11pt for substantive text, and a 12pt for headings, with a “left justified” margin, not “full justification” which reads oddly in many cases.)

Order your résumé in the most commonly accepted format, or a close variation:

  1. Heading
    1. name
    2. address or city and state
    3. phone numbers
    4. email address
  2. Career Objective
    1. You do not need to place a heading above your career objective. Just state the objective
    2. Use either paragraph or bullet format.
  3. Education
    1. Reverse chronological order
    2. Degree obtained
    3. Name of institution
    4. Relevant or notable activities
    5. Dates of attendance (or years only, for “mature’ applicant)
  4. Skills / Achievements
    1. bullet list format
    2. include your most notable achievements, including percentages & dollar amounts when possible
    3. include only your most relevant skills (after achievements)
    4. dates and information like company name are not needed here; it’s just a summary of your most notable achievements
  5. Professional / Relevant Experience
    1. Your work history, in reverse chronological order (most recent employer listed first)
    2. Your job title
    3. Name and location of employer
    4. Dates of employment (last 10 years, generally)
    5. bullet list of significant / relevant achievements
    6. DO include volunteer and pro bono work, if relevant
  6. Additional Relevant Memberships / Skills / Activities / Awards
    1. bullet list format
    2. brief description of relevant awards
    3. brief description of relevant memberships
    4. brief description of relevant activities
  7. Key Competencies / Skills
    1. Some jobs benefit from this added section. Only include what is relevant to the position you seek, like …
      1. the type of software you can use, and your proficiency level
      2. the types of equipment you can operate, and your proficiency level
      3. languages you speak, and your proficiency level
      4. personal attributes that are directly relevant (i.e., “confident public speaker”)

Notice that there is not a heading for “References” or for “Hobbies”. Do not include them in your résumé, nor should you include a statement that “References will be provided upon request.”  That’s old school and will date you, showing that you’ve not taken the time to research current standards for résumés.

A CAVEAT

Having said all of this, I will remind my regular readers — and point out to my new or visiting readers — that there are exceptions to every rule.  For a good example of how someone “got the job” breaking nearly every rule, you might want to read this article.

If you would like an evaluation of your résumé, I will provide you with a free critique!  But, make sure you’ve first followed the rules of résumé writing and prepared the best document you can prepare. And, PLEASE CLICK HERE TO READ SUBMISSION GUIDELINES FIRST.

~Lynda C. Watts

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